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20319203Jeet Roy, a college Casanova, has published a book by unfair means. All he wants is to earn loads of money and have hot girls chase after him wherever he goes. Rohit Sehdev, a one book old popular fiction writer is furious when he finds out that his publisher has cheated him out of his royalties. Karun Ahuja is a highly ambitious schoolboy who wants to win the heart his lady love by writing a novel about it and he doesnt mind playing dirty to get to the top. Ruthlessly exploiting these ambitious young men is their unscrupulous publisher. Sometimes funny, sometimes shocking, Paperback Dreams is the story of a new breed of young writers who will do anything to get famous, fast.

Thoughts : The book, as you can tell from the blurb, has three male characters, each struggling with “love” and with success or lack thereof. Jeet Roy, an author who’s published a book that wasn’t written by him and is currently looking for another book that isn’t going to be written by him, is also constantly looking for his next fling. He doesn’t look at a woman for any other reason and has simply become an author to find more fans to sleep with. His lack of intelligence shows in the way this thinks, “My dazzling smile. My hot body.” And he constantly thinks everything is an innuendo, “”Do you have a pen?” A question with a dirty annotation. I like that. “Of course I have one. Every man has to have one.” Reading about him is nauseating in itself and the author has done a good job in showing off what a piece of work he is.

Rohit on the other hand is the everyman author who is paranoid about everything and is in constant struggle with thinking he is amazing and doubting the worth of his existence at all. On the other hand he is the only decent character in this book so you are left with no choice but to back him up. And finally Karun, the typical Indian middle class schoolboy who’s been raised to think too much of himself and shows that off in every single thing he does, right from plotting against other authors so he can publish his book to no competition or thinking that every girl desperately desires him.

What was good was the fact that you could figure out who was talking without looking at the chapter title for the name of the character. They have distinct voices for the most part and the characters, while absolutely pathetic, are distinguishable easily. I did find the lack of female protagonists a little annoying because it left me with no one to connect with or root for. The female characters that are present in this book are either perfectly innocent darlings or vindictive and “character less” women who do whatever they want to get what they want (aka, behave like men). A nice balance would have been nice, a realistic woman who resembles how women are in real life. But if that doesn’t bother you, it’s a good purchase

The author has written an Indian commercial book (yes that’s a genre in itself) about Indian commercial writers and what they do to get their success, right from employing a PR army to promote their books to giving bad reviews to other author’s books. Now while I usually don’t read Indian commercial books because getting through them is a task in itself, this one wasn’t difficult to read at all and can be finished in two hours if you read at an average speed. It does have the typical Bollywood clichés but because there is an actual story to follow, it wasn’t that obvious. I gave it 3 stars.

The book is simple to read and easy to understanding leaving little to no work on the reader’s part. This is perfect for readers of Durjoy Dutta (I haven’t read anything by him) and Chetan Bagat or for those teenagers who mostly watch Bollywood or regional movies and are just starting to read.

Buy Paperback Dreams on Amazon

*I was sent a copy by the author in exchange for an honest review, this hasn’t affected my opinion in any way.

*The link provided is an affiliate link, When you make a purchase using this link I get a small commission which costs you nothing but helps me in keeping the blog up. Thank you.

 

 

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